4.25.2005

013. Portfolio Contemplation

The original idea of this blogging class was to get online so that our school could post it's portfolio's for everyone to read, including teachers and outsiders of the school. Bud wrote a post, asking what we thought about the idea of it.
We started a discussion in our class, asking if we wanted to use our current blogs as our portfolios or create a second one.
We agreed to create a second one.
The problem is of where to host the longer pieces of work. Bud suggested OurMedia, and I thought of Fiction Press. We're experimenting with both.
Another problem we're having (un-portfolio related) is trying to find a new Wiki to post on since the one we're currently using might not be use-able by us anymore because the website may begin charging for its services.

This isn't too much fun.
Any suggestions?

012. Reply to a Comment

I came to check on my blog today and I found a comment from Tom Hoffman.
This begs the question, what is "maturity." In lots of adult jobs, the best thing to do is keep your mouth shut, your head down, and at least appear to do what you're told. That's something you'll learn in a big school. Is that more "mature" behavior? Is that mature citizenship?
I have a feeling that this post might have a slight amount of journalism, so please bare with me. I'm going to try and address each question as it's stated, so I'll see how it goes.
what is "maturity."
Maturity has a definition, and I don't think covers the true meaning.

1.
1. The state or quality of being fully grown or developed.
2. The state or quality of being mature.

I really don't think this is true. A thirty year old could be completely developed, but not mature. Maturity is, I think, the use of intelligence that one person may possess. This intelligence, whether large or small in quantity, really doesn't matter. The thing that does matter, is the quality of said intelligence, and the way in which someone applies it.
Maturity has nothing to do with age or growth/development. It has to do with the intelligence and the way in which people carry themselves and apply that intelligence. A seven year old could have more maturity and intelligence than someone I go to school with.
In lots of adult jobs, the best thing to do is keep your mouth shut, your head down, and at least appear to do what you're told.
Yeah, I agree. In lots of adult jobs people do that. But I do understand the meaning of this because of the next sentence.
That's something you'll learn in a big school.
I attended a big school for three years, and I agree. You just be quiet, keep your head low and do what people tell you. But, I'm not at a big school, I'm at a really, really small school. And here, you don't have to keep your mouth shut, your head down, or appear to do what you're supposed to be doing.
You can open your mouth.
Hold your head high.
And not do what you're doing because you want to be occupying yourself with something else.
In a big school you do not have to be like that either. It's a choice and it's a bad one. You can have free thought, in work and in education/school. If people didn't open their mouthes, this class that I'm currently in would not exist. Maybe even blogging wouldn't exist, but that isn't the case here.
Big schools, big companies, big jobs. They all have the same expectations for people, one of which is the 'shut up and sit down' idea. But without those that go against the normal ideas, then where would we be? The biggest point I have is that this class would not exist without Bud, who didn't shut up about something he was interested in; and education is a large field to work in, and bringing it to the head guy is a big deal. Now I'm rambling, though.

Is that more "mature" behavior? Is that mature citizenship?

Both? *shrug* I don't know; that's a bigger question than I'm able to answer, I think. That's a much more in depth idea than what I'm able to really answer. I think that's more of a debate subject, rather than something to reply to in a blog.

If anyone wants to do further contact me on this idea, please feel free to e-mail me.

4.19.2005

011. Exploring Blogging Questions

In the class we've begun a wiki, which is something that anyone and everyone can edit. Well, ours is a wiki of blogging questions and rules. Today, I'm supposed to be picking out a rule and figuring out how to answer them or how to react to them.

The question of choice?

7. What would happen with the class when you compare different maturity levels in a large high school, compared to a smaller, less populated high school?

Well, that's kinda hard to answer, but at the same time it isn't. It's hard in the fact of comparing maturity levels, since the level of maturity differs from person to person; you could meet a thirteen year old who acts twenty-five, or a thirty year old who's maturity level is of a ten year old. It's strange.
But, you can compare the probability of blog usage in a small school compared to a large school.
I go to high school of 100 students as I previously explained. It's easier to compare in a fact that it's workable in both enviroments.
In the school of 100, you have smaller classes, with a lot more trust, and sometimes a higher maturity level. When you compare it to another school, say a University, it also works.
I've found a lot of different places that use blogs in their programs. Not just from the U.S.A., but from Canada too (Yay Canada! It's where I'm from).
I think the most amazing one I found, was the Blogging University for people to attend. So really, blogging in a small group is just as easy as blogging in a big group. Although I still think that the smaller group would be easier; in a sense of both being able to trust the students, and monitor the things that happen in the blogs.

Another question is kind of arising now...

Who uses blogs, and why? Does it expand beyond the classroom and personal uses?

Yes. It does. For example, the
Blogging University I mentioned before, is for people in the higher positions in the workforce. There's also a small business blog.

I hope to further expand on this, but we'll see.

010. Moe's Birthday

H A P P Y

B I R T H D A Y ,

M O E !

4.18.2005

009. A few more rules.

Alright, well since we're supposed to be adding more of the prospective blog rules. I just had a bit of an epiphany.

In another post of mine:


Prospective School Blogging Rules.

1. Do not link to your personal blog/journal from your school blog; you might reveal information on there that you don't want to reveal on your school blog.
2. Never share personal information about you, or the school.
3. If you want to write your opinion on a topic, make sure you're not going to be offensive to anyone as you write it.
4. Always make sure you check over your post for spelling errors, grammar errors, and your use of words.
5. Never disrespect someone else in your blog, whether it's a person, an organization, or just a general idea. You don't want someone making a stab at what you are passionate about; don't do it to someone else.
6. Don't write about other people without permission; if you can't get their permission, use first names only. Never share someone elses last name.
7. Watch your language! We're not at home, we are at school, this has to be at least remotely professional looking.

Alright.

8. Make sure things you write about are factual. Don't be posting about things that aren't true.
9. Keep it education-oriented.


4.17.2005

008. A question.

I'm actually really curious about something else.
What about pictures? Should the students be allowed to post their pictures, and if they do, would they be teacher/school-approved?
Another thing; what about kids who are under 13? Some blogging sites will not let kids under 13 register; that's definitely a limit on the program if introduced to the school district.
And what about posting essays and photo's of art projects, etc. What would happen with plagerism on the students part, or if someone plagerised the students essay?
Hm. I have no idea how to answer these questions and it's kinda confusing. Sometimes, I wonder if this class makes me think too much :P Especially having these random thoughts so late at night.

4.14.2005

007. Blogging Rules?

Alright, another question was posed by Bud. Yeah, it was a while ago; I'm a slacker for class work. I just like to post what I think. Random thoughts deserve space, too.

But yeah!

Prospective School Blogging Rules.

1. Do not link to your personal blog/journal from your school blog; you might reveal information on there that you don't want to reveal on your school blog.
2. Never share personal information about you, or the school.
3. If you want to write your opinion on a topic, make sure you're not going to be offensive to anyone as you write it.
4. Always make sure you check over your post for spelling errors, grammar errors, and your use of words.
5. Never disrespect someone else in your blog, whether it's a person, an organization, or just a general idea. You don't want someone making a stab at what you are passionate about; don't do it to someone else.
6. Don't write about other people without permission; if you can't get their permission, use first names only. Never share someone elses last name.
7. Watch your language! We're not at home, we are at school, this has to be at least remotely professional looking.

That's all I can come up with right now. Let me know what you think and if you have any additions..
Thanks!

006. Wow, another post.

Yeah, I know, I have a lot to say today. Sorry if you have to read a bit too much from me, I've got quite a few things to say, and a lot of ideas whirling around my head.

Journaling versus Blogging.

Alright then.
  1. What is the difference?
  2. Journaling versus Blogging, where is the line drawn?
  3. Why is the line drawn there?
  4. Is there really a difference?
  5. What is the potential of the two as seperate entities?
Okay, easy to ask the questions, not so easy to answer.

1. The difference? Easy. Will Richardson wrote about it here. Using Xanga as an example of a journaling community.
2. The line isn't easily drawn. Which kinda sucks; it'd be easier to classify things then. The line is mostly drawn on personal feelings being put into it. The line between venting and writing something intelligible. Whether you're writing about how bad your day was, or about a subject you discussed in a class. If someone can relate to it, and direct you to further information on the topic, I'd say it's blogging. If someone says "Sorry to hear of your inconveiniences" then I'll depict it as journaling.

3. I think the line is drawn there because blogging is the more professional and educated side of the internet-writing, while journaling is leaning towards a personal point. Journaling online is the equivelent to writing in a notebook that you keep in your drawer.
4. There is definitely a difference, as explained above. I kinda feel strange now because I used to refer to my personal Xanga as a blog, when it's actually a journal.
5. Well, the potential for a online journal is something I'm pretty sure of. It's potential goes to the point where you can get your feelings out there without having to talk to someone, or resort to spilling your entire life out to someone because you just need to let it out. Blogging, though... that's harder. The potential that blogging has is endless. But, I think that one of it's many potential uses will arise from this class.

Elle.

4.13.2005

005. What would happen?

You know, I'm really curious about something. I was wondering what would happen beyond my school. I currently attend a very small school in Colorado, currently one hundred students or so, making it very small classes and a tight community. Which, I think makes this blogging experiment very probable. I find that the people I attend school with are mature on a much higher level than a regular high school. Maybe this would be easier if I further explained my school.

I currently attend an alternative school that kids go to when they feel they don't really fit in at regular high schools. We have people from ages thirteen to nineteen, with a wide variety of backgrounds. We're a tight knit community with people that definitely are beyond their years in many ways (not all of us, but the majority). My school is definitely not like a regular high school.

Anyway, back to the subject at hand.

I really, really want to know where this experiment would go beyond the walls of my school. Say we took it to a regular, public high school that has about 1,000 students, rather than 100.
  • What would happen with the different maturity level that is compared between a high school, and my alternative school?
  • Would the trust be the same?
  • Would the same opportunities be available?
  • Would we be allowed to do the same thing?
  • If I wasn't attending this school, and taking part in this experiment at a different school, what sort of rules would be put down on this, compared to the rules that are being created here?
  • Would the curriculum be different? Why? Why not?
  • Would the teacher treat it differently than Bud? Would the kids have the same passion as we do?

I'm so freakin' curious about this, y'know? And now I'm aware that people are out there listening/reading what I actually have to say. This class definitely makes me feel like I'm a part of something bigger than just a classroom.

Elle

004. Catching Up

Well, I missed class today (bummer), so I read a few blogs and I'm now attempting to catch up on what I missed :)

What uses do blogs have in schools?


I think that blogs would be a useful tool for kids to access homework assignments and notes from the day if they miss school (like I did). So they they can stay up to date rather than falling behind, and it gives the student more responsibility, too.
I think another use would be for kids to critique eachothers work for a specific class, so that the student had an easier way of getting feedback before turning the assignment in, which could possibly help improve grades.

Are your current uses of blogs something that would be useful for schools now?

Eh, probably not. My use for blogs is personal, I vent, express, etc. in my blog, basically just complain about life, or brag about it. It really doesn't have anything to do with school.

What would be a way that your personal and public uses of blogs might intersect?

I think one way that they might cross eachother is when I post comments about a class; asking people that read my blog questions about a movie, or question, or topic that was brought up at school that day. Another time they might intersect is when I post snippits of my essays, etc. to see what people think.

4.04.2005

003. Yes, yes I am a blogger.

1. Why do you use blogs? What do you currently use blogs for outside of school (if you do)?

I suppose I use blogs mostly for my own system of 'venting'. I find it easier to write my emotions out rather than talking them out. Writing is a better form of expression for me, whether it's in happiness, sadness, or anger.
I currently use
Xanga for my personal blog so that I can vent about problems that I have. I also use LiveJournal for the groups, since with some I get help on homework or assignments, and have feedback given to me on my writing.
I use blogs for a number of reasons, but the biggest is emotional expression.

2. What are some reasons why you think blogs might be useful at our school?

I think that blogs would be useful for our school because it would be a better way for us to showcase the work that we are proud of, and get feedback on it from not just teachers but other students, too. I also think blogs would be good for the school since prospective secondary school institutions could look at the blog and see what the work is like that we do, so it's almost like an online portfolio and resume for us to use.

3. What are some potential problems that you see with blogging at school?

Mostly privacy and censorship issues. Deciding on what language is suitable or not, what subjects we may or may not write about. Plus the fact of usage of people's names, or the name of facilities, it makes it hard to put the line between okay, and not okay.

4. Should student blogs be made public for the world to see, or just our school community?

At first it should be just the school community to see how it runs and if it's a good idea to have it be a public thing, then, if feedback is god, I think it would be a good idea to have it be public to anyone that wants to see. But, if we do that, there's a lot of privacy and confidentiality issues involved in it, that we wouldn't have to deal with on a community-only-basis.

5. What are some rules that bloggers at our school should follow?

A think a definite rule is that we can not disclose our direct location, maybe say what state or county we are located in, but nothing other than that. I also think that we should not link to personal blogs if we have them, to keep our private and social lives away from that of our academic.